T at home

When I first got started on testosterone, I was prescribed androgel, which I had to apply to my abdomen, upper arms and/or shoulders daily. Each dosage came in a sealed packet, which I found hard to open due to my EDS. So after a couple of months I switched to sustanon injections once every two weeks.

I got my first injections administered by my GP’s assistant, who subsequently taught me how to do it myself. I’ve been giving myself these injections under his supervision for a couple of months, until I felt ready to do this at home, without any supervision.

Last Thursday I administered my first jab at home. Alone. I wasn’t nervous. I’d done it so many times, I knew I could do it, so nothing to worry about. However, what I had not thought about, was how much preparation it took.

When I went to the GP’s assistant, everything was ready when I came in. All I had to do, was get my vial of testosterone out of my backpack and get on with the job. Not this time. I had to lay out a syringe, two needles and some gauzes beforehand. (Sorry, just the packaging on the picture, as I didn’t take pics until after I’d done the deed.)

T-1

Also, some sticking plaster, a pair of scissors and – most importantly – the sustanon itself.

T-2

Administering the injection was pretty straightforward. Jab in the leg, insert testosterone, pull back needle, all done. As the testosterone comes in a rather oily solution, you insert it slowly, so as to minimise pain and discomfort afterwards. Usually, my muscle is only a little sore for one or two days after the injection, but nothing too bad and I very much prefer my injections over the application of the gel.

Now, at the GP’s they had this special box to dispose of the needles and vial, but at home I didn’t have any such thing, and I’d forgotten to ask for one at the pharmacy, so I had to come up with a clever idea pronto. As I’m a huge fan of Greek yogurt, I usually have one or two empty yogurt containers taking up space in my kitchen, so I grabbed a yogurt container and had my impromptu needle container. No need to get a fancy one from the pharmacy, as far as I’m concerned.

T-3

Now all I had to do, was sort the waste (paper and plastic wrappers will be recycled), and I was almost done.

T-4

I wrote down my next “appointment” in my diary, and added an L in brackets, to make sure I remember to stick the needle in my left leg next time.

T-5

All in all this first injection at home took almost as much time as it would have done had I gone to the GP’s assistant again, but I’m sure this will improve once I have established my own routine here.

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About Liam

Poet, writer, aspiring minimalist
This entry was posted in FTM, transgender, transition and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to T at home

  1. johnmitchk says:

    That sounds both cool and terrifying 😀 But then again I still haven’t gotten over my fear of needles XD Which reminds me, did you get the needles from your pharmacy and if so, did you need any notes or something to explain why? I’ve been told that over here, I could just ask for one for desentising purposes but I’m not sure how.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Liam says:

      I got the needles from the pharmacy, but I had a prescription. Still had to pay for them, which took me aback a little, as I thought my health insurance would cover the costs. Bummer. But I guess this may be different from one country to another, so I’ve no idea how this works where you live.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. janitorqueer says:

    I’ve been doing the injections at home, and so far – so good. But it feels like the more time goes by, the more reluctant I am to jab the needle!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Liam says:

      For me the first time was the hardest. Still not all that hard, but I did have to take a deep breath before jabbing the needle. Now it feels more like routine, and I don’t really mind.

      Liked by 1 person

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